Tuesday, 20 December 2016

Salmon: What is happening to our salmon runs: An excellent hypothesis from the Tweed Foundation

This is an excellent piece of work which looks at changing salmon run timings in the River Tweed, Scotland and relates them to changing oceanic temperatures. These same factors may be affecting our salmon run size and timing.


River Tweed Salmon: Historical Analysis

Thursday, 17 November 2016

Sea Trout and Salmon Farming: New Study Demonstrates negative effects of warming waters.


Infestation of sea trout Salmo trutta L. by salmon lice Lepeophtheirus salmonis is associated with increased mortality risk and possible sub-lethal effects. Separating anthropogenic causes of infestation from background ecological variability has proved difficult. A unique 25 yr dataset was collated comprising lice counts from >20 000 sea trout sampled from 94 separate river and lake systems in Ireland and Scotland at varying distances from marine salmon farms. Statistical models were developed to explore the potential effects of distance to a salmon farm, rainfall and ambient temperature on sea trout lice infestation and body condition (weight at length). These models indicated that sea trout captured closer to salmon farms had significantly higher levels of lice infestation, and that this effect was exacerbated in warmer years. Sea trout sampled closer to salmon farms also had significantly reduced weight at length (impaired condition), with the strongest impact in dry years. The study dataset covers a broad geographic area over multiple years, and accounts for variability in temperature and rainfall. Our results imply a rather general impact of salmon farming on lice infestation and body condition of sea trout. This finding has implications for current lice control management strategies, coastal zone planning, recovery of sea trout stocks in aquaculture areas and the scale of aquaculture free zones. 

Click Here for Full Study: Interesting Study Fish Farming Areas

Sunday, 13 November 2016

Salmon and Sea Trout Tagging Regulations 2017: Public Consultation

The Tagging Regulations are open for public consultation over the next 30 days in relation to the 2017 season. There appears to be a quite sizeable reduction in surpluses available on the majority of rivers. This has become apparent over the last number of years with dwindling commercial and rod catches.



Tagging Regulations for 2017

Thursday, 10 November 2016

River Water Quality Continues To Decline: Salmon at increased risk


Outlook Progress with Water Framework Targets (EPA: 2016)
"The slow progress in improving the ecological status of surface waters means that new approaches are needed. The target of 13.6% improvement in ecological status for surface waters from the 2009 baseline by 2015 included in the first cycle RBMPs has not been achieved (EPA, 2015b, 2016a). Instead, the overall situation has not changed during the first river basin planning cycle. A radically different approach is required to target management measures to where they are needed. There is an opportunity to improve implementation under the new water governance structures recently put in place and by using the integrated catchment management approach supported by better evidence and science."

Monday, 3 October 2016

Important Study needs Your Support and Help

Salmon Watch Ireland actively promotes the following study being carried out by UCD. The project is currently being undertaken at the School of Biology and Environmental Science and concerning the migration of fish in Ireland’s rivers. 
The project is part of a PhD program undertaken by Siobhan Atkinson
The project is called 'Reconnect', and the overall goal of the project is to develop a validated methodology for prioritising a selection of barriers for modification or removal to improve hydro-morphology and connectivity in Irish rivers. An important first step in the project is to build a map of the location of barriers, both natural (waterfalls) and man-made (bridge aprons, weirs, sluices, culverts) in Ireland's rivers. 



These structures can cause problems for fish and invertebrate migration, and the movement of natural river material.
As you can imagine, locating and mapping river barriers is a big job. To help map barriers and to help create awareness of their impact we've introduced an app from the UK called 'River Obstacles'






http://www.river-obstacles.org.uk/ that can be used to record barriers. We are trying to encourage professionals in the field and members of the public to use the app to record any barriers they encounter when they are out and about. The records that are uploaded via the app can be viewed on a map of Ireland with details, a photograph and GPS co-ordinates
(http://www.river-obstacles.org.uk/obstaclemap). The app is free to download and very easy to use. One simply takes a photograph of the obstacle and notes some details. The app uses the GPS facility built into a smartphone to map the location.

Here are the links to our Facebook page and website if you are interested:

https://www.facebook.com/ReconnectRivers/
http://www.ucd.ie/reconnect/
Salmon Watch Ireland believes that migration barriers are a major obstacle to the rehabilitation of our rivers and asks our supporters to please help Siobhan in this most interesting study.

Wednesday, 7 September 2016

Salmon Statistics Report Northern Ireland:Salmon survival on Northern Ireland's Rivers


Very informative information from Northern Ireland. The salmon smolt productivity on the River Bush is interesting in that it fluctuates from year to year indicating juvenile mortality can be high in certain years. Please take the time to look at full report as it is important. 


Please click on Link: Salmon Report Northern Ireland

Sunday, 14 August 2016

Fish Counter Data 2015: Very Interesting Data

Salmon Watch Ireland welcomes the publication of data in the public domain for 2015. The counter data demonstrates the low numbers of salmon and sea trout returning to Ireland's rivers in 2015.
It appears that a significant increase in 2016 may have occurred and hopefully represents a change in the negative trend noted in recent years.
The report may be accessed at http://www.fisheriesireland.ie/fisheries-management-1/658-consolidated-fishcounter-summary-report-2015/file

Sunday, 29 May 2016

Standing Scientific Committee : Salmon Catch Advice 2015- Fish Counter Numbers



Salmon Count Data: Interesting data from Standing Scientific Committee on Ireland's counter data.
It demonstrates an alarming decline in runs but hopefully in some rivers in 2016 we may see a reversal of this decline. Any comments would be appreciated.


Friday, 27 May 2016

Important Angling Survey

Salmon Watch Ireland would like to recommend that all persons interested in angling should take the time to participate in this survey. 


The ESRI is undertaking research on the socio-economics of inland fisheries within Ireland, with the objective of providing evidence that will support policy decisions regarding the management of fisheries resources and angling within Ireland. The current research programme will run for three years, from 2015 to 2018, including topics such as:
• The economic benefits of a fishery in a rural location;
• Angling preferences and experiences among non-Irish nationals;
• An analysis of recreational angling demand in Ireland;
• Preferences of international tourist anglers.
To inform our research we are looking for the views and opinions of anglers.  Accordingly we have established a voluntary angler panel, which we will use to ask anglers about their angling activities and views.  Members of the angler panel will be invited to participate in short surveys to elicit their views.  We anticipate around 1-3 surveys per year.  Each survey is voluntary and you can decide at the time whether to participate, nothing is mandatory.
Our research programme on the socio-economics of inland fisheries is funded by Inland Fisheries Ireland.  Any data you provide will only be used for research purposes.  The data will not be shared with Inland Fisheries Ireland or other organisations and will only accessible to the researchers undertaking the analysis.  Only research reports and papers, which contain aggregated summary analysis, will be provided to policy decision-makers, including Inland Fisheries Ireland.  Our research papers will be publically available to download via our website.  If you’d like further information about the angler panel or our fisheries research please contact John Curtis (john.curtis@esri.ie, 01 863 2000).
 http://www.esri.ie/angling/

Wednesday, 25 May 2016

REVERSE THE DECISION TO ABOLISH THE DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

Campaign created by Friends of the Earth, VOICE, BirdWatch, An Taisce, Irish Wildlife Trust


An open letter to An TAOISEACH:

Please recognise the value of a healthy environment and reverse your proposed abolition of the Department of the Environment. A healthy environment is the basis of a good quality of life for everyone and supports and sustains resilient communities. We urge you to reinstate the Department of the Environment and bring together all environmental functions - nature and water protection, waste and pollution control - under one Department of the Environment, Climate and Natural Heritage.

Please click on link below and support this worthwhile campaign


Please support the call to retain the Department of the Environment


Monday, 16 May 2016

Registration Details Role and Formation of River Trusts in Ireland

The Role & Formation of River Trusts in Ireland
FREE REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN
• The number of Rivers Trusts is growing across Ireland.
• Are you running a Rivers Trust in Ireland?
• Are you interested in forming a Rivers Trust?
• Do you need advice and support?
• Would you like to learn more about the work of Rivers Trusts across Ireland and the UK?

If the answer is YES, please register now!
In conjunction with the Irish International Fly Fair*, the Dibney River Conservation Trust and the Atlantic Salmon Trust (http://www.atlanticsalmontrust.org/), invite you to attend this important workshop.
Attendance is free but places are limited and you must book a place on line (https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-role-formation-of-river-… ) – the booking site will remain open until late June but early booking is advised!
Date: Friday, 1st July 2016
Location: Killyleagh Community Centre, Killyleagh, Co Down,
Time: 09.30 to 16.00
*Those attending the workshop might also like to visit The International Fly Fair – Killyleagh Castle, July 2nd and 3rd
See: (http://www.irishinternationalflyfair.com/ )

Saturday, 14 May 2016

Program for Government: Commitment to Investigate Closed Containment Systems

Salmon Watch Ireland welcomes the following extract of our new government's program.



The issues surrounding the impact of sea lice and escapees can be solved with closed containment and Ireland can be at the forefront of the rollout of  this new and trusted technology.

The aquaculture industry cannot further expand globally without this technology due to factors involving sustainability, relating to disease and parasite induced mortalities to farmed fish. We as always focus on wild fish and we see closed containment as a relatively fail safe technology which can help to put in place a barrier to transmission of sea lice to our wild fish and to further safeguard our wild salmon genetic pool by eliminating escapees from farms.

Monday, 9 May 2016

The Role & Formation of River Trusts in Ireland

The Role & Formation of River Trusts in Ireland

Are you running a River Trust in Ireland? Are you interested in forming a River Trust?
Do you need advice and support? Would you like to be up to date with the overall Rivers Trust movement?
If so please save the 1st July for a visit to Killyleagh, Co Down
In conjunction with the Irish International Fly Fair*, the Dibney River Conservation Trust and the Atlantic Salmon Trust ( http://www.atlanticsalmontrust.org/ ), invite you to attend this important workshop.
Attendance is free but places are limited and you must book a place on line – the booking site will open in mid-May.
Date: Friday, 1st July 2016
Location: Killyleagh Community Centre, Killyleagh, Co Down,
Time: 09.30 to 16.00
Attendance is free but places are limited and you must book a place on line – the booking site will open in mid-May. Date: Friday, 1st July 2016Location: Killyleagh Community Centre, Killyleagh, Co Down,Time: 09.30 to 16.00Attendance is free but places are limited and you must book a place on line – the booking site will open in mid-May. Date: Friday, 1st July 2016Location: Killyleagh Community Centre, Killyleagh, Co Down,Time: 09.30 to 16.00See: (http://www.irishinternationalflyfair.com/ )
*Those attending the workshop might also like to visit The International Fly Fair – Killyleagh Castle, July 2nd and 3rd

Thursday, 5 May 2016

Marine Harvest Closed Containment: The Future?

Sea lice control, R&D top Marine Harvest farming agenda

Mitigation of sea lice remains one of Marine Harvest’s chief goals, as it looks to focus its farming operations on "sustainable" growth in anticipation of the salmon supply bottleneck expected later this year.
Writing in the Norwegian group’s recent annual report, CEO Alf-Helge Aarskog said “biological issues” meant supply was in danger of falling further behind growing demand.
“This is not good for the long-term development of the industry, and we are convinced that better production methods are required to ensure
growth,” he said.

Aarskog suggested that Marine Harvest has a responsibility, as a leader of the “blue revolution” to “make sure growth is achieved sustainably”. Last year, he added, was “challenging from a cost perspective”, with the Bergen-based farmer allocating more of the company purse to sea lice control than in 2014.

Wednesday, 9 March 2016

Letter to ALAB : Recent High Court Ruling

Salmon Watch Ireland
6 Sutton Castle, Shielmartin Road, D13NN20, Dublin 13 Niall.b.greene@gmail.com
Phone: +353 1 832 4852



8 March 2016

The Secretary
Aquaculture Licences Appeals Board Kilminchy Court
Dublin Road PORTLAOISE
Co Laois


Dear Secretary

I refer to my letter and submission of 15 October 2015 about Salmon Watch Ireland’s appeal in respect of the granting of aquaculture and foreshore licences reference T5/555.

We now wish to draw your attention to the following development which impinges on the basis on which the Aquaculture Licences Appeal Board will be making its determination in this case:
The Supreme Court has recently restated, in three significant judgments, the legal position in Ireland regarding development consents in which important environmental and conservation considerations arise.  This applies in respect   of projects which can have an adverse impact on European Sites that are designated pursuant to the Habitats Directive or the Birds Directive to be Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) or Special Protected Areas (SPAs). The judgments were delivered by Mr Justice McMenamin, Mr Justice Charleton,  and Mr Justice Clarke, in the case of Cromane Foods Limited & Anor -v- Minister  for Agriculture, Fisheries & Food & Ors [2016] IESC 6. Relevant extracts from the judgment are set out below.

While the Cromane case primarily concerned the application of legitimate expectation and public policy in Ireland, it contains important and authoritative restatements of Irish law regarding the application of Article 6.3  of  the Habitats Directive. This involves the central requirement to ensure certainty that  there  remains  ‘’no reasonable scientific doubt regarding the absence’’  of    adverse
effects on designated European Sites, before consents can be given in  situations where there may be risks of adverse impacts.

Wednesday, 27 January 2016

Salmon Hatchery Conference: Report by Ross Finlay and John Murphy

INTRODUCTION


Salmon Watch Ireland hosted its annual conference on the 21st of November in the Ballsbridge Hotel, Dublin.

The 2015 conference, entitled “Hatcheries and Stocking- have they a role in restoring salmon stocks”, investigated the potential role of stocking in restoring Ireland's dwindling stocks of Atlantic salmon. The official opening was conducted by Mr. Alex White, Minister for Communications, Energy, and Natural resources. Following introductory remarks from SWIRL chairman Niall Greene, five talks were given by experts in salmon ecology, conservation, and stocking.  Each talk was followed by a discussion period in which attendees brought their own varied perspectives to the table, sparking some healthy debate.